Accenture breaks through milestone of 100.000 women

14 January 2014 Consultancy.uk

Accenture has broken through an impressive milestone. The specialist in the field of management consulting, technology and outsourcing has recently passed the counter of 100.000 female employees. With this feat women make up more than one-third of Accenture’s workforce, estimated at roughly 281,000.

Male world? Not anymore…

For decades consulting was an industry that was dominated by men. Yet over the past decade or so, in line with the increased focus on diversity, consulting firms have intensified their efforts in attracting and retaining women. This is certainly also true for Accenture: since it years ago turned diversity into a cornerstone of its strategy, its male-female ratio has significantly improved.

Accenture Vrouwen

The success of the ‘female transition’ can to a large part be attributed

a number of large programmes that ensure that women feel at home within the multinational. An overview of the key programmes:

Defining success. Your way

A global women's theme that encourages all Accenture women to create their own path to success.

International Women's Day

An annual celebration in more than 200 locations of the U.N.-designated day which, this year, will focus on Knowing and Growing Your Career Capital.

Customized training

As part of its $870 million annual investment in training, it also has modules specific for female leaders such as ‘Developing High Performing Women’ and ‘Maximizing Performance: Women in Leadership’. 

Accenture High Performance Delivered

Accenture Women's Network

A global internal portal that connects women across the company and provides education, tools, multimedia and discussions. 

"Our commitment to inclusion and diversity at Accenture, including attracting, retaining and advancing women, is critical to being a high-performance business," says Pierre Nanterme, Accenture CEO. "Our unique programs for women aim to support their career development and progression and help them thrive - not just in their careers, but also in their family and personal lives," adds Nellie Borrero, Managing Director of Global Inclusion & Diversity at the firm.

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Women remain underrepresented in UK's hospitality industry leadership

12 April 2019 Consultancy.uk

Female engagement at the top level of the UK hospitality industry is still lagging, with the vast majority of decision-making roles continue to be held by men. Only 7% of the industry’s FTSE 350 CEOs are women; however, the pay gap in hospitality and leisure is far better than in other industries, at a median of approximately 7%.

The hospitality, travel and leisure (HTL) sector is one of the UK’s largest employers, with 3.2 million people working in its segments. Despite a poor 2018 in terms of tightening consumer spending, the industry is still one of the top sectors in terms of economic activity, hitting £130 billion last year – besting the UK’s automotive, pharmaceutical and aeronautical sectors’ combined activities.

While the industry is one of the country’s largest employers, it still faces considerable issues around diversity at the top. New analysis from PwC has explored the matter, as well what initiatives the industry has engaged to open up its top ranks to a more diverse background.

Female representation at board level for UK companies and HTLs

According to a survey of CEOs, Chairs or HR Directors of over 100 of the most significant leisure businesses across the UK, the hospitality industry has a relatively male-dominated top level. This lags behind the FTSE 100, where companies have female board level representation at 32.2%. Meanwhile, the figure for the combined executive committee and direct reports stands at 28%. This is well above FTSE 250 levels, where female board level representation stands at 22.4% and executive committee & direct reports stand at 27.8%.

For the hospitality industry as a whole, board level representation came in at 23.6%, with FTSE 350 for the industry performing slightly better at 25.1%, while non-listed companies performed considerably worse at 18.2%. The firm notes that the figures hide that while some companies are making strides to improve equality, others are not moving forward – with the positive result reflecting more often the good work of some, while others are not taking the issue seriously in their agenda setting.

Blind spot

The study states, however, that while the overall numbers are relatively strong, the industry has a number of acute weaknesses. These include CEO numbers, with only 7% of HTL FTSE 350 companies helmed by women and 11% of non-listed companies led by female CEOs. Meanwhile, female chairs at FTSE 350 companies for the sector stand at zero. In terms of wider diversity representation, only 1 in 33 leaders at industry companies is from a BAME background.

Pay gap for HTL and hospitality

The report noted discrepancies between FTSE 100 companies and FTSE 250 in terms of improving the number of women at executive level. The majority have met the Hampton-Alexander Review target of 33% women at board level, up from around 25% in 2016. However, the remaining ~40% are not on target, and are unlikely to meet the target by 2020. A similar trend is noted when it comes to executive committee and direct reporting numbers.

Jon Terry, Diversity & Inclusion Consulting Leader at PwC, said, "To make real progress in diversity and inclusion, businesses need to elevate it onto the CEO’s agenda and align diversity & inclusion strategy to the fundamentals of the business."

Tracking progress FTSE 250 level

However, one area where hospitality travel and leisure companies are outperforming other companies in the wider UK economy, is the mean and median pay gap between men and women. PwC found that the median of the wider UK economy comes is approximately 14% – with upper quartile companies noted for a gap of low 20%, and lower quartile companies noted for differences of around 2%.

The median pay gap for HTL comes in at well below 7%, with the median close to parity. There are considerable differences, however, with hospitality at 7%, while travel comes in considerably higher, at 22%. The latter figure reflects fewer women in higher paid pilot and technical positions within the industry.