Daniel Cameron named partner in PwC deals practice

31 July 2023 Consultancy.uk 2 min. read
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As the firm looks to expand its UK deals practice, PwC has appointed Daniel Cameron as a partner. He brings more than 25 years of professional services experience to the role.

Bringing over two decades of experience in procurement and supply chain management, he will apply his knowhow at PwC across industry sectors including financial services, telecommunications and media. Cameron will be part of the firm’s value creation and realisation team, sitting within the deals practice.

Cameron said of his new challenge, “I’m excited to be joining PwC and look forward to supporting clients as they embrace a more digital future, balancing cost, ESG and resilience in their supply chains.”

Daniel Cameron named partner in PwC deals practice

Beginning his career as a graduate at Mazars, in 1998, Cameron has since held consulting and procurement roles at Network Rail and Royal Mail. He went on to become global procurement co-lead at Goldman Sachs, before taking on the position of chief procurement officer at Quilter. Most recently, Cameron ran his own company, carrying out advisory work for start ups and advising companies on their procurement needs.

Cameron initially joined PwC in 2022 on a contract for its deals and value creation wing. As a permanent member of PwC’s deals practice, he now will lead on third party related transformation programmes for enterprise and mid market clients. In particular, Cameron will focus on the financial services segment.

Speaking on the appointment, Lucy Stapleton, PwC’s UK head of deals, added, “I’m delighted to welcome Dan to our deals practice. Dan brings deep understanding and expertise in digital supply chain management and procurement that strengthens our position in the market and our offering to clients. This underpins our continued investment in technology across Deals and the specific focus on our technology alliance partnerships.”

The global market for deals has seen a poor start to 2023, amid tough trading conditions in leading markets across North America and Europe. As a result, the world has seen the smallest number of deals worth over $100 million since the end of the Great Recession.