Auto insurance industry and InsurTechs can learn from telematics in Italy

22 September 2016 Consultancy.uk

Matteo Carbone, Principal at Bain & Company in Italy, reflects on how InsurTechs can learn from the experiences the Italian auto insurance industry has gained from its use of telematics. 

The insurance sector is becoming more innovative. Various initiatives and projects launched around the globe are proof of that: from the classic “call for ideas” and corporate venture capital to innovation labs and accelerators that involve the largest insurance companies. According to CB Insights, InsurTech—which involves rethinking one or more steps of the insurance value chain through the use of technology—received $650 million in funding in the first quarter of 2016, and the number of transactions more than doubled compared with the same period in 2015.

The Italian insurance sector represents an interesting case history about InsurTech. Italy has the most advanced experience in combining the car insurance contract with hardware (the black box) and using that data throughout the insurance value chain. According to the Connected Insurance & Innovation Observatory – a think tank that Bain & Company developed with ANIA, AIBA and other insurance and non-insurance partners to help spread innovation culture in the insurance sector – telematics penetration reached 16% of all cars insured in Italy by the last quarter of 2015.

Telematics penetration in Italy

The use of telematics data allows for pricing based on the driver’s journey instead on a snapshot of static data at the beginning of the year. The technology supports not just pricing of insurance products, but also the management and payment of claims, together with nurturing customer relationships. The analysis by the Connected Insurance & Innovation Observatory further shows that the telematics penetration is correlated to the level of motor third party liability (MTPL) premiums. Key insight is that telematics is not only feasible for the highest premiums – in fact, 51% of the Italian market uptake is witnessed in the segment with a MTPL premium of under €400.

In Italy the telematics approach can be called mainstream, in contrast with other countries, where it is still a niche value proposition. By looking at the Italian best practices, one can identify certain critical success factors. The most important element is telematics’ capacity to improve the insurance bottom line: A significant self-selection effect exists on customer acquisition and material savings related to claims settlement (provided that adequate processes are in place and use the telematics information). The second aspect is represented by the benefit of introducing value-added services around the driver journey. The key element for both the client and the distributor is the partial kick-back of the value generated by the telematics approach on the insurance bottom line to both the client (via a discount) and the distributor (via additional fees).

Telematics penetration in Italy by MTPL premium

The current discussion of how telematics will evolve focuses on gamification and reward mechanisms: mechanisms to manage client engagement and retrocession prizes other than insurance premium discounts. For example, Allstate in the US has adopted a score- and prize-based system related to driving behaviour. The international best practice is undoubtedly Vitalitydrive, the approach through which Discovery (South Africa) has managed to create a motor-telematics policy based on driving behaviour. In this case, the cash-back incentive for gasoline bought from partner gas stops replaces the premium discount.

By comparing gamification use cases with Italian best practices, insurers can retain an incremental quota of generated value, through telematics solutions that provide rewards financed by partners instead of through premium discounts. This approach requires the creation of an ecosystem of partners to provide a tangible value for the customer.

Maturity of telematics in insurance industry

Rewards can be effective ways to steer behaviour if they are built on mechanisms that result in frequent interaction with the client. From this point of view, the integration of monitoring driving behaviour and the reward-system mechanism has a greater influence on behaviour than a tariff that calculates the renewal premium based on those same variables.

The stakes are high for the insurance sector, and the auto insurance mandate has created the conditions for insurance companies to become relevant actors within the ecosystem. That said, the insurance sector faces a double challenge: first, to introduce this type of creative thought inside the product development process and second, to become equipped with competencies and instruments that enable the management of both gamification dynamics and the partner ecosystem. These challenges are forcing insurance carriers to start thinking and acting like InsurTech entities.

Earlier this month R204 Partners, a private venture fund run by Bain & Company partners in Italy, invested in the Italian startup Qurami.

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Four ways digitalisation is transforming car brands and dealers

16 April 2019 Consultancy.uk

From changing expectations from the customer to new stakeholders entering the industry, the digital transformation of global automotive industry means it is facing the wholesale transformation of its business model. In a new white paper, global consulting partnership Cordence Worldwide has highlighted four major digital trends that are transforming the relationships between car brands and dealers with consumers.

With digital transformation drives booming across the industrial spectrum, automotive groups are no different in having commenced large digital transformation programmes to improve productivity, efficiency, and ultimately profitability. Falling sales figures mean the automotive sector is facing an increasingly difficult road ahead, something which means companies in the market are even more hard pressed to find new ways to improve their bottom lines.

While it offers major opportunities, the industry’s move to digitalise is not without complications. It has triggered a series of major internal changes, which have presented automotive entities with the challenge of becoming a “customer-oriented” industry. A new report from Cordence Worldwide – a global management consulting partnership present in more than 20 countries – has explored how automotive companies are navigating the rapidly changing nature of digital business.

New business models

The level of change likely to be wrought on the automotive industry by digitalisation is hard to overstate. Automation could well lead to significant reductions in the number of accidents, higher vehicle utilisation and lower pollution levels, while leading to a $2.1 trillion change in traditional revenues, with up to $4.3 trillion in new revenue openings arising by 2030.

As a result of this colossal opportunity, it is easy to see why almost all automotive groups now have digital departments, with generally strong communication within the digital transformation and the customer approach. The changes to society which this may have are potentially distracting automotive firms from the change it is leading to in its own companies though, according to Cordence’s paper.

The automotive market is dead, long live the mobility market

Because of this, the sector’s business model is set to transform over the coming decades. With digitalisation speeding up the appearance of concepts such as car-sharing, a subscription package model will likely become more palatable. At the same time, car and ride-sharing models will cater to the sustainability criteria of millennials, who will rapidly become one of the automotive market’s leading consumer demographics in the coming years.

Antoine Glutron – a Managing Consultant with Cordence member Oresys, and the report’s author – said of the situation, “These ‘old school industries’ are now working on creating new opportunities, but in so-doing are facing challenges and threats: new jobs, new technologies, new ecosystem of partners, necessary reorganisation, different relationship with customers, and even new businesses. The customer approach topic is in fact a real challenge for car companies as it implies changing their business model and adjusting their mind-set to address the customer 4.0: from product-centric to customer-centric, from car manufacturer to service provider.”

Digital customer experience

In the hyper-competitive age of the internet, even top companies face an uphill challenge when it comes to holding onto customers through brand loyalty. Digital disruption has resulted in changes to consumer behaviour, which is forcing a range of marketing strategists to reconsider their old, possibly out-dated strategies. As modern customers wield an increasingly impressive array of digital tools and online databases, they and are now able to quickly and conveniently compare prices, check availability and read product reviews.

The automotive sector is no exception to this trend, according to the study. In order to adapt to the needs of the so-called ‘customer 4.0’, car companies will increasingly need to change their business model and move away from product-centric companies to customer-centric ones, from car manufacturers to service providers.

Glutron explained, “As an automotive company, you can no longer expect customer loyalty simply with good products; you must conquer and re-conquer a customer that “consumes” your service. The offer now has to be global, digital and personalised. Your offer has to be adapted to this customer’s needs at any given moment. A key issue related to data control is to build customer loyalty by creating a customer experience 'tailored' throughout the cycle of use of the 'car product': purchase, driving, maintenance and trade-in of the vehicle.”

One way in which the sector may be able to benefit from this desire for a tailored experience is via connectivity. Consumers are generally positive about new connective features for automobiles, and many are even willing to pay upfront for infotainment, emergency and maintenance services. Chinese consumers, where the connected car market is set to hit $216 billion, are already particularly interested in paying a little more for navigation and diagnostic features in their future new car. This can also enable automotive companies to exploit a rich vein of customer data, enabling them to rapidly tailor their offerings to consumer behaviour.

New automotive segments

Digital transformation has also brought with it the rise of completely new application areas. As mentioned earlier, the most well-known example is the autonomous or self-driving car, where the last steps forward were not taken by major automotive groups but by technology companies such as Tesla. While this may have given such firms the edge in the market briefly, a number of keystone automotive names will soon be set to take the plunge into the market themselves, leveraging their car manufacturing prowess and huge production capacities to their advantage.

Before companies rush to invest in this market, however, it is worth their while to remember that the readiness and uptake for such vehicles differs greatly geographically. For example, following a study published in 2018, 92% of Chinese would be ready to buy an autonomous car, compared with only around 35% of drivers in France, Germany and US. Meanwhile, the infrastructure of different nations will also be significantly less accommodating of the new technology.

Use digital for steering thr activity

Elsewhere, Cordence’s analysis has suggested that hooking the cars of tomorrow into the Internet of Things is also likely to see a rapid change in the business model for car maintenance, providing real-time diagnostics for problems. This presents chances for partnerships to improve the connectivity of cars, especially with tech companies; for example, PSA partnered with IBM for a global agreement on services in their vehicle. Meanwhile, data could also be sold to other parties with an interest in this data, such as the government, which could use it to manage traffic levels, or ensure that only adequately maintained vehicles take to the road.

Glutron added, “With the increase in the amount of client data and connected opportunities, the recommendation is to set up data-centric approaches. The value is now in the customer data. The general prerequisites are to rework the data model and the Enterprise Architecture and generally build up a data lake including data from all sources (internal and external, structured and unstructured).”

From automotive to mobility

Relating further to the idea of connectivity, the report claimed that automotive firms must now adjust their models in line with the provision of end-to-end mobility, rather than treating the sale of a car as an end point in their relationship with the customer. In order to realise this transformation, transformations are likely to become more and more important.

A network of partner companies means automotive firms can provide a global mobility experience. As the vehicle is increasingly connected to its environment, new partners can also be cities, governments, and other service providers within the global mobility services industry in which the car brands want to take part.

According to the study, the target is clear. Companies must look to a holistic transport service, offering to move customers from A to B in a unique and pleasant way – otherwise they might as well take public transport. At the same time, they should extend the services reachable “on-board” (especially the enhancement of the connectivity between the car and smartphones or other connected devices), and reach high standards in terms of user experience (online sales, online payment, customised experience during and after the use of the car).

Concluding the report, Glutron stated, “These mobility market transformations could be considered a threat for the car manufacturers. Quite the opposite: if they take up the challenge and review their business model so that they become the service provider – communicating no longer to a driver but to a ‘mobility customer’ – they can then take advantage of their expertise and their position as a historical player. The most convenient means of transport are cars, and building a car is highly-skilled work.”